Samsung begins rolling out Android 4.4.2 update for Galaxy Note 10.1 (2014 Edition)

If you own a Galaxy Note 10.1 (2014 Edition) W-Fi ( see our review ), you’ll be pleased to learn that Samsung has finally begun rolling out the Android 4.4.2 KitKat update . Note that we’re currently at the beginning of the process with only select markets receiving the upgrade for the time being, but it’s well on the way.

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Samsung begins rolling out Android 4.4.2 update for Galaxy Note 10.1 (2014 Edition)

Nokia X Review

Introduction One of the forefathers of the modern phone industry, Nokia is revered by many to this day for the level of build quality of its devices, and yet that didn’t help the company when it was caught off guard by the stratospheric surge in demand for smartphones. Many thought that the Finnish company made all the wrong decisions, especially when it decided to go for an infant of an operating system in Windows Phone. The thought of what Nokia could have been like if it instead at least had hedged its bets, and adopted Android as well, is still stuck at the back of the heads of many industry watchers, not to mention fans. We won’t be having a miraculous remake of history today – it’s too late for that – but we all finally have the opportunity to see what Nokia hardware powered by Android feels like. With its X-line, Nokia surprised many by finally seeing fit to experiment with Android, though hardheaded as the company is, this is still a fork of the platform. The 4-inch, dual SIM entry-level Nokia X that we’ll be looking at today, then, comes with all the signature Nokia services like its app store and HERE Maps, but none from Google. There’s no Play Store, no Google Maps, and many, many more. And while there’s a degree of inter-compatibility (ergo, normal Android apps will usually run just fine on the Nokia X’s software), it’s still a halfhearted stab at the world’s most popular mobile OS. Is that necessarily a bad thing? We were very intent on finding out and share our impressions with you, so keep on reading. In the box: A power plug with a permanently-attached microUSB cable Headphones Design The Nokia X borrows inspiration heavily from the Lumia 525 and Asha 503 – the X is a typical rectangular slab with sharper-than-average corners and excellent build quality Whether it’s because it is a near-flawless look-alike to the latest Asha 503 , or because the Asha, in turn, draws inspiration from Nokia’s Lumia 520 / 525 , we felt like we knew the Nokia X from the get-go. The X inherited the singular capacitive ‘back’ button from the the Asha line, and the rectangular frame with its moderately sharp edges. The removable rear shell is made of solid matte plastic, same as the buttons on the right side of the X. Both the volume rocker and the power key provide profound feedback, and there’s a nice amount of travel to them. Handling the Nokia X is easy – the small device is perfect for one-handed use – but we couldn’t shake off the feeling that we’re using a toy phone. And it’s not just the jubilant palette of color options – it’s also the profoundly plastic, but very solid exterior that made us feel like we’re operating a reinforced, child-proof piece of hardware. On the bright side, while there’s no arguing this looks and feels like an entry-level device, the overall build quality is impressive. Display Reflective, dim, and completely off when it comes to proper color reproduction When looking at the 4-inch 480×800 pixel resolution IPS display on the Nokia X, the results speak for themselves, and align very well with our initial impressions. For starters, this isn’t the sharpest panel out there, though at 233ppi, we didn’t find much reason for complaint. But it’s in color reproduction that the panel totally disappoints – it’s got a very cold color temperature of 9320K, resulting in a noticeably bluish fringe throughout. This problem is especially noticeable when the display has to render differing shades of gray. But that’s not all – specific colors, like magenta and cyan, are seriously messed up. Greens and reds are also problematic. Worse yet, the display isn’t very bright, managing 359 nits at its very best. This, combined with the highly reflective glass on top of the display, amounts to a frustrating outdoors viewing experience. It’s also relatively bright even at the lowest setting, meaning that usage in complete darkness may tire out your eyes quickly. Display measurements and quality View all View all The CIE 1931 xy color gamut chart represents the set (area) of colors that a display can reproduce, with the sRGB colorspace (the highlighted triangle) serving as reference. The chart also provides a visual representation of a display’s color accuracy. The small squares across the boundaries of the triangle are the reference points for the various colors, while the small dots are the actual measurements. Ideally, each dot should be positioned on top of its respective square. The ‘x: CIE31′ and ‘y: CIE31′ values in the table below the chart indicate the position of each measurement on the chart. ‘Y’ shows the luminance (in nits) of each measured color, while ‘Target Y’ is the desired luminance level for that color. Finally, ‘ΔE 2000′ is the Delta E value of the measured color. Delta E values of below 2 are ideal. This measurements are made using SpectraCal’s CalMAN calibration software. The Color accuracy chart gives an idea of how close a display’s measured colors are to their referential values. The first line holds the measured (actual) colors, while the second line holds the reference (target) colors. The closer the actual colors are to the target ones, the better. This measurements are made using SpectraCal’s CalMAN calibration software. The Grayscale accuracy chart shows whether a display has a correct white balance (balance between red, green and blue) across different levels of grey (from dark to bright). The closer the Actual colors are to the Target ones, the better. This measurements are made using SpectraCal’s CalMAN calibration software. View all

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Nokia X Review

OnePlus One display and components leak, Xiaomi preparing a tablet for April 23 announcement?

Some days, the smartphone industry can be unforgiving. OnePlus, the Chinese up-start that wants to one-up all smartphones out there with its upcoming OnePlus One, is getting punched from two sides today. First, the Great God of mobile leaks, @evleaks, published a photo of the OnePlus One’s fancy innards for everyone to see. We have its display, the inside of its chassis, and the motherboard. There’s not a whole lot to deduce from the photo, but we have to note that the parts seem extremely well crafted. They give out that “custom-built” quality that’s typical of high-end gear. Look at the logo and the “designed by OnePlus” branding on the board – they aren’t even meant to be seen from the outside, but they are there! The display panel’s shape, meanwhile, looks a lot like that of the Oppo Find 7. This is somewhat predictable, given that OnePlus is founded by Oppo expats. In the smartphone world, such leaks are equal to a celebrity’s paparazzi shots leaking out – and the hotter the celebrity, the crazier everyone goes. Granted, the OnePlus One isn’t quite as craze-inducing as the next iPhone or the Samsung Galaxy Note 4, but its one of 2014′s most hyped smartphones nevertheless. You know why, because we’ve sung the song about its high-end specs and low-end price enough times already . We’re eagerly awaiting its next-week announcement (April 23), but guess who else’s got their sights firmly pointed at the calendar? It’s our best-selling overseals pals at Xiaomi, and from the looks of it, they are planning to steal some thunder away from OnePlus by introducing the vendor’s first… is it a tablet? Xiaomi just posted this promotional image that shows the date, some beautiful Chinese writing that (very) loosely translates to “expect the unexpected”, and the angle of a device that seems familiar to Lenovo’s Yoga tablets . It could also be something else entirely, like a track-pad or a Wi-Fi router, but we expect something more unexpected from Xiaomi. That’s not all there is to this, though. Below, we have these leaked images of an actual Xiaomi tablet, but strangely enough, they don’t look like the gadget in the poster. Unless these are prototype images, the tablet looks like an ordinary, functional slab of plastic. Reportedly, it’s called the Mipad, and it has a 720p 7 or 8-inch display, a Snapdragon 400 CPU, 1GB RAM, 8GB of storage space, an 8MP rear camera, and, wait for it – LTE! It also runs Android 4.3. We’ll wait and see what the Chinese vendor is up to soon. source: @evleaks , GizChina ( 1 , 2 )

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OnePlus One display and components leak, Xiaomi preparing a tablet for April 23 announcement?

LG G-Pad 8.3 sees insane price cut at Tesco UK, now available for £119

UK supermarket Tesco has a sweet deal for anyone looking for a brand new Android tablet. The white LG G-Pad is now available for just £119, part of the supermarket’s Easter Deals. That’s a massive saving of £130 for an 8-inch tablet with a quad-core chip and 16GB internal storage. While it’s the Wi-Fi model, we’re still filing this under “awesome deals”. Be quick though, it only runs until Tuesday.

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LG G-Pad 8.3 sees insane price cut at Tesco UK, now available for £119

Samsung and Amazon partner up for new custom Kindle experience

Samsung and Amazon today announced a new custom Kindle experience for consumers who own Samsung Android hardware. This eBook service, Kindle for Samsung, is available to all Galaxy hardware running Android 4.0 or above. If you’re using a smartphone from another vendor, fear not as the official Kindle app will remain available for download.

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Samsung and Amazon partner up for new custom Kindle experience

Sony to roll out Android 4.4 to Xperia Z hardware in May

Sony is set to bring Android 4.4 (KitKat) to consumers this coming May, according to the Sony website. Those who own older Xperia Z products will be updated to the later version of the operating system. This covers the Xperia Z, ZL, ZR and the Xperia Tablet Z. We previously looked at the company’s plans to bring Android 4.3 and 4.4 to its portfolio of Android hardware, which revealed a mid-Q2 launch for KitKat on older Xperia Z-series devices.

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Sony to roll out Android 4.4 to Xperia Z hardware in May

Custom everything! Samsung will have a dedicated Kindle book store

Samsung Electronics and Amazon announced a broad agreement to launch Kindle for Samsung, a custom-built eBook service. The app will debut in April starting with the Galaxy S5 along with existing Samsung Galaxy smartphones and tablets above Android 4.0 worldwide. As part of the service, Amazon and Samsung will launch Samsung Book Deals, available to all customers using Kindle for Samsung. Samsung Book Deals provides up to 12 free eBooks a year to all referred Galaxy device’s customers who use the service. Users can choose a free book from a selection of four different titles every month. Each book is chosen specifically for Galaxy smartphone and tablet users from a wide selection of prominent titles. “We are delighted to be able to deepen our long-standing relationship with Amazon and offer Kindle for Samsung as the perfect app for reading on a smart device. With this service we demonstrate our commitment to creating and broadening key content partnerships that deliver rich and personalized experiences for our customers,” said Lee Epting, Vice President, Samsung’s Media Solution Center Europe. “We’re thrilled that Samsung has chosen Kindle as their eBook provider,” said Jorrit Van der Meulen, Vice President, EU Kindle. “With Kindle for Samsung, people around the world will have instant access to the best digital bookstore and reading experience, including more than half a million titles that are only available from the Kindle Store, and innovative features like Whispersync, Time to Read and much more.” Kindle for Samsung offers readers millions of best-selling books, newspapers and magazines on their mobile devices including over 500,000 titles which are exclusive to the Kindle Store. Other features include Whispersync, which saves and synchronizes the last page read across devices, so that a reader can always pick up wherever they left off. Time to Read shows how much time it will take to finish a chapter or a book based on personalized reading speed. Worry-Free Archive automatically backs up the user’s Kindle books to the cloud, so that they never need to worry about losing their books. Kindle for Samsung is immediately available in over 90 countries from Samsung apps. *All functionality features, specifications, and other product information provided in this document including, but not limited to, the benefits, design, pricing, components, performance, availability, and capabilities of the product are subject to change without notice or obligation. – See more at: http://global.samsungtomorrow.com/?p=35871#sthash.hF6ThT9E.dpuf

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Custom everything! Samsung will have a dedicated Kindle book store

QHD screens: yes or no; Windows Phone 8.1 update, and Sony’s 6-month upgrade cycle: Q&A 19

PhoneArena is taking a look at some intriguing topics surrounding recent events. Namely, we’re answering questions about Sony’s 6-month upgrade cycle, the Windows Phone 8.1 update release date, the status of QHD screens, and more! Be sure to post your questions below for next time!

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QHD screens: yes or no; Windows Phone 8.1 update, and Sony’s 6-month upgrade cycle: Q&A 19

iPhone 6 ‘s alleged battery photographed, might indicate the phone has grown in size

According to leaks from Apple’s supply chain, the iPhone 6 , which is set to begin small-scale trial production in May, will have a battery capacity of no more than 2000mAh, with the surest prediction hovering at 1700mAh. This sounds plausible, considering it marks another incremental addition to the battery capacity, following the 130mAh increase between the iPhone 5 (1440mAh) and iPhone 5S/5C (1570mAh). There’s also a purported spy photo of the battery – it’s the same elongated, rectangular block we know, but there’s a difference in how it attaches to the smartphone’s logic board. The pins appear to be positioned on the top of the battery, instead of on its side, like in the iPhone 5S. The difference is indicative of a redesign in the handset interior, possibly engineered to accommodate a larger display. It’s inevitable that an increase from 4 to 4.7-inches (the iPhone 6′s most persistently rumored screen diagonal so far) will lead to a bigger, wider handset, so it’s obvious that Apple’s engineers are working to make the most efficient use of the additional space. If the battery photo is legitimate, it could be considered proof that Apple is resizing the iPhone. But it’s always better to keep the salt-shaker nearby when it comes to rumors. via MyDrivers.com

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iPhone 6 ‘s alleged battery photographed, might indicate the phone has grown in size

Huawei Ascend Y330

Positioning – This field shows the positioning systems supported by the device. There are three main types: GPS, A-GPS and GLONASS. GPS – This is one of the most widespread global positioning technologies, developed and maintained by the U.S. government. It uses satellites in order to detect your location. Works best in clear weather. A-GPS – A-GPS stands for Assisted GPS and is the industry standard for positioning and navigation. “Assisted” means that it can use local wireless networks, in addition to satellites, for quicker and more precise localization. GLONASS – GLONASS is a global positioning system, developed by the Russian Federation. It’s very similar to GPS, but isn’t so popular in cell phones.

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Huawei Ascend Y330